The Nation shone brightly yesterday at the 26th Diamond Awards for Media Excellence (DAME), winning three coveted prizes of the 13 categories reserved for the print media.

Multiple award-winning Associate Editor Olatunji Ololade clinched two awards – UNICEF Prize for Child-Friendly Reporting and Honorable Justice Moronkeji Onalaja Memorial Prize for Judicial Reporting.

Ololade’s entry in the Child-Friendly Category is titled: This child has no blame, published on July 23, 2016. His entry for Judicial Reporting is titled: Life on death row: Tragic lives of Nigerian prisoners, published on June 4, 2016.

Other nominees in the Child-Friendly category are The Nation’s Kunle Akinrinade and Hannah Ojo.

Ace sport writer Taiwo Alimi won the S.O. Idowu Prize for Sport Reporting, beating The Punch’s Arukaino Umukoro and TELL’s Anthony Akaeze. Alimi’s entry, titled: The making of Olympic champions, was published on October 16, 2016.

This newspaper also got nominations in other categories, including Sovereign Trust Insurance Prize for Insurance Reporting in which  The Nation’s multiple-award winning Head of Investigation Desk, Adekunle Yusuf, came as first runner up.

Two Senior Judicial Correspondents – Joseph Jibueze and Eric Ikhilae – are first and second runners up in the Judicial Reporting category won by Ololade.

The Nation also came as first runner up in the Newspaper of the Year category. The paper was nominated in Tunji Oseni Memorial Prize for Editorial Writing and UNICEF Prize for Child Friendly Medium.

The Nation Editor Gbenga Omotoso was the first runner up in Editor of the Year category.

Editor-in-Chief and publisher of Premium Times, an online newspaper, Mr. Dapo Olorunyomi, received Lifetime Achievement Award for his contribution to the development of media practice and investigative journalism.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Diamond Publications Limited Mr. Lanre Idowu, described all the nominees as winners, saying the objective of the award was to deepen the culture of professionalism in Nigerian journalism.

For the first time since 1992, Idowu said DAME was not giving out prizes for all the categories in broadcasting, noting that all entries submitted for broadcasting prizes were of poor quality.

On why the event was held in the middle of the week, the DAME boss said there was nothing unusual as it reflected the spirit of the time. Idowu said his organisation had been experiencing challenges, just has other organisations.

“It is important to keep the ideals of the award alive despite the challenges,” Idowu said.

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